Wednesday, February 17, 2021 04:37 PM

FOOD ALLERGY DEATHS HAVE DECREASED, BUT SCIENTISTS WARN OF CONTINUED RISK TO CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE - INEWS

Food allergy[1]deathshavedecreasedinthe last 20 years, butscientistshave warned about continued risks for children and young adults.

Scientists at Imperial College Londonanalysedhospital admissions for food-induced anaphylaxis asevere allergic reaction between1998and2018. The results showed that despite an increase inhospitalisations, the number of deaths has dropped.

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Between 1998 and 2018,hospitalisationsfor food-induced anaphylaxis rose by more than 5 per cent per year.In 1998, 0.7 per cent of people admitted to hospital with food-induced anaphylaxis died. By 2018, that figure had dropped to 0.3 per cent.The studys authors suggested this may be because of better awareness of food allergies and improved treatment.

Anaphylaxis rare

It is estimated that nearly two million people in the UK suffer with food allergies. Symptoms of allergic reactions can be mild,including anitching sensation inside the mouth, ears and throat, a rash, and facial swelling.

Sufferers in some cases experienceanaphylaxis[2], which canbe fatal. However, deaths from anaphylaxis are rare.The researchersestimated there arefewerthan 10 fatalitiescausedbyfood allergiesper year in the UK.

Nuts are among the common many food groups people can be allergic to (Photo: Unsplash)

Although the low fatality rate is good news,thestudys authorsurged ...

News source: GOOGLE NEWS

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