Friday, February 14, 2020 03:05 PM

CHOLESTEROL DRUGS MIGHT HELP CURB PROSTATE CANCERS - WEBMD

By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Feb. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs that many men with prostate cancer[1] might already be taking -- cholesterol-lowering statins -- may help extend their survival if they have a "high-risk" form of the disease, new research suggests.

High-risk patients include men with high blood levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and a "Gleason score" of 8 or more. Gleason scores are a calculation used to gauge prognosis in prostate cancer. Men with a high Gleason score[2] may develop difficult-to-treat cancers.

Prior research had suggested that statins and the diabetes drug metformin (often prescribed together) have anticancer properties. However, it hasn't been clear which of the two drugs is the bigger cancer-fighter, or whether either might help against high-risk prostate cancer.

To help answer those questions, a team led by Grace Lu-Yao of the Sidney Kimmel Cancer[3] Center--Jefferson Health, in Philadelphia, tracked data on nearly 13,000 high-risk prostate cancer patients. All were diagnosed between 2007 and 2011.

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News source: GOOGLE NEWS

See also: The Robotic Urologist