Tuesday, August 22, 2017 05:39 PM

WORRIED ABOUT YOUR EYES AFTER THE ECLIPSE? HERE’S WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

So if you did not make a proper pinhole projector[1], use specially designed glasses that complied with international safety standards, or even don a welders helmet[2], you might be noticing some changes to your vision today.

Symptoms to watch for

The extent of eye damage depends on how long someone stares at the sun though even a few seconds could be destructive. If you glanced at the eclipse and then looked away, then back again, that could have caused problems because the effects are cumulative, said Dr. Jack Cioffi, the chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at Columbia University.

Less than a few seconds, it is highly unlikely there is going to be much damage, he said.

Some of the symptoms to look out for are blurriness, a blind spot in your central vision, or a decrease in vision in which you notice an inability to read something you would have been able to read before the eclipse. It might also interfere with recognizing faces, or driving, ...

News source: The New York Times

See also: EastRidgeEyeCenter