Tuesday, August 15, 2017 09:26 PM

PRIVACY ADVOCATES ADVISE SUPREME COURT TO PROTECT PHONE LOCATION DATA UNDER THE 4TH AMENDMENT - TECHCRUNCH

Among the Supreme Courts many upcoming cases is Carpenter v. United States[1], which will settle the question of whether your location and movements, as determined by the ordinary interactions of your phone with the network, are protected by the Fourth Amendment. Dozens of companies, advocates, experts and interested parties just weighed in ahead of the hearing.

The issue, briefly summarized: Timothy Carpenter was convicted partly by the use of 127 days (and 12,898 individual location points) of cell site location information (CSLI) acquired by police from telecoms without a warrant. The argument that this information was protected, and that its collection constituted unreasonable search and seizure, failed to convince the Appeals court.

Just as a refresher, heres that Fourth Amendment:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

The ACLU, which represents Carpenter in the case

News source: Supreme Court

See also: Davis & Hoss