Tuesday, December 06, 2016 09:39 AM

LACK OF SUN IN TEEN YEARS LINKED TO NEARSIGHTEDNESS LATER ON

Teens and young adults who spend more time outdoors may be less likely to become nearsighted later in life than those who spend less time outdoors, a new study suggests.

People in the study who spent more time exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation which the researchers calculated based on the participants' exposure to sunlight between ages 14 and 39 were less likely to be nearsighted at 65 than those who spent less time exposed to UVB radiation, the researchers found.

"Increased UVB exposure was associated with reduced myopia, particularly in adolescence and young adulthood," the researchers wrote in the study, published yesterday (Dec. 1) in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology. Myopia is a term that eye doctors use for nearsightedness, where people can more clearly see objects if they are closer.

In the study, the researchers looked at 371 people with nearsightedness and 2,797 people without nearsightedness who lived in various locations in Europe, including Norway, Estonia, France, Italy, Greece, Spain and the United Kingdom. The people in the study were 65 years old, on average.

Trained researchers examined the participants' eyesight , and collected blood samples to examine the levels of vitamin D in their blood. They did ...

News source: Fox News

See also: EastRidgeEyeCenter