Tuesday, October 29, 2019 03:00 AM

HALLOWEEN CAN BE FRIGHTFUL FOR KIDS WITH ALLERGIES, ASTHMA

SATURDAY, Oct. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Allergies[1] and asthma[2] can turn Halloween into fright night, so parents must be vigilant.

Some fun-sized candy bars have no labels to alert about possible food allergens, such as peanuts, said Dr. Todd Mahr, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

But food allergens aren't the only potential concerns.

"Halloween happens in the fall, so trick or treating involves being aware of fall allergies[3]," Mahr said in a college news release.

Ragweed and other types of pollen[4] can trigger fall allergies[5]. Keep pollen out of your house by leaving shoes at the door, and having children shower, wash hair and change clothes after they've been outdoors. Kids who take allergy[6] meds should continue their medications for two weeks after the first ...

News source: MedicineNet

See also: Steven Enrich