Thursday, September 01, 2016 10:12 AM

LOW TESTOSTERONE EXPLAINED

In recent years, Spyros Mezitis, MD, PhD, has found himself talking to a lot more male patients about low testosterone[1], a diagnosis he says is becoming increasingly common.

"More men are getting older, and men are more open about talking about erectile dysfunction[2]," Mezitis, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, tells WebMD.

On the one hand, increased diagnosis of low testosterone[3] is driven by an aging population, less stigma, and more precise tests. But there's another big reason why men come to Mezitis' office for a testosterone[4] test.

"Men are bombarded by media, by advertising campaigns -- 'Don't feel well? Ask your doctor about low testosterone[5],'" he says.

They come in saying they feel excessively fatigued, weaker, depressed, and that they have lost their sex drive

News source: WebMD

See also: The Robotic Urologist